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May 31, 2007

Videos of My Recent Talks

Decade of the Mind Talk Video,  May 21, 2007, George Mason University, VA

Decade of the Mind Panel Video1 and Panel Video 2, May 22, 2007, George Mason University, VA

Cognitive Computing 2007 Talk Video, May 2, 2007, Berkeley, CA 

May 29, 2007

My Mathematical Genealogy

You can check out my academic father, grandfather, great grandfather, etc. here.

The genealogy traces my lineage back to famous mathematicians such as C. Felix Klein, Carl F. Gauss, Rudolf Lipschitz, Martin Ohm, Gustav Dirichlet, Simeon Poisson, Joseph Lagrange, Leonhard Euler, Bernoulli Brothers, and, eventually, to Gottfried Leibniz.

I was so delighted to discover this connection. Smile

May 23, 2007

Cognitive Computing 2007 Videos are now Online!

We are happy to announce that the videos from Cognitive Computing 2007 held on May 2-3 at Berkeley Art Museum are now online:

http://cognitivecomputing2007.berkeley.edu/ 

Press Coverage: Decade of the Mind

I spoke at the extremely successful and enjoyable Decade of the Mind Symposium.  The event has gotten some nice media attention:

Brain research poised to dramatically advance global society
First Science
http://www.firstscience.com/home/news/chemistry-physics-and-materials-sciences/brain-research-poised-to-dramatically-advance-global-society_28802.html

Brain research poised to dramatically advance global society
Medical News Today
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=71750

Mason Prepares for Involvement in 'Decade of the Mind'
The Mason Gazette
http://gazette.gmu.edu/articles/10199/

May 18, 2007

Paul Rhodes

At Almaden, we had an amazing talk by Dr. Paul Rhodes of Evolved Machines, Inc. and Stanford University. He gave us a preview of some unpublished work.

Title:
Neuronal components are connected with stochastic and dynamic synapses: implications for biological and synthetic neural computation

Abstract:
The sensory and motor performance displayed by biological systems is an existence proof arguing for the value of reverse-engineering brain circuits.  In biological neuronal circuits the synapses mediating transmission between neurons are stochastic devices, so that for example an incoming signal might be relayed with a probability of 30% at each of the 1,000’s of synapses formed by an axon.  Further, transmission probability itself dynamically changes as a function of the recent pattern of input, so that a given synapse may increase or decrease its probability during a train of incoming signals, in a frequency-dependent manner.  Finally, these dynamics are specific to the subtypes of neurons being connected.  Among the consequences of this set of properties is that various elements of a complex cortical circuit may fade or emerge differentially as a function of the pattern of sensory activity.  Clearly the simulation of biological neural circuits, on any scale, requires incorporation of synaptic connections which adequately capture the dynamic and connection-specific stochastic properties of transmission.  Here I present a comprehensive model of cortical synapses, incorporating 5 interacting biophysically interpretable mechanisms which together enable the computation of transmission probability in a manner closely matched to experimental data.   These model synapses may be used both in biologically plausible models of cortical circuitry as well as in synthetic neural arrays allowing exploration of the functional role and benefits of pattern-specific stochastic transmission in biological and artificial neural systems.

Biography:
Dr. Rhodes is a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University and the head of Evolved Machines, Inc., a neural circuit applications research group in Palo Alto.

Dr. Rhodes academic research in the 1990’s concerned simulations of cortical neurons and circuits, including the first model of bursting in cortical pyramidal cells (Rhodes and Gray 1994), the prediction of backpropagation in dendritic trees, and studies of the functional implications of synaptic integration in active dendritic trees (summarized in a review in Cerebral Cortex, 1999). He is the founder of Evolved Machines, Inc., a research organization pioneering the synthesis of artificial neural circuits and their application to olfaction and visual object recognition. The group is developing the first synthetic neural arrays which wire themselves by simulating neural circuit growth in 3-dimensions, and is the first company to harness the power of programmable GPU’s for the simulation of neural computation, now achieving > 100-fold acceleration of the computing power of conventional cores. The company’s goal is the development of the first generation of devices truly based on brain circuitry, pioneering the fusion of neuroscience and engineering to develop new categories of machines which embed some of the capacities of biological neural systems.

Dr. Rhodes received a Ph.D. and M.S. in Neuroscience under Dr. Rodolfo Llinás at NYU Medical School, and received an M.S. in Physics from Stanford University after graduating with an A.B. in Physics, Magna cum Laude, from Harvard University.

May 11, 2007

Celebrating 10th Anniversary of Game 6 between Deep Blue and Garry Kasparov

"Ten years ago today, IBM's Deep Blue (NYSE: IBM) became the first computer to win a chess tournament against a reigning world champion chess master.

Deep Blue had 32 processors and could process about 200 million chess moves per second in its historic six-game match against Garry Kasparov."

References:

http://www.research.ibm.com/deepblue/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Deep_Blue
http://www.sys-con.com/read/374500.htm

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2007/05/murraycampbell_qa

May 05, 2007

ENF 2007: Emulating the Mind

On July 23, 2007, in Vienna, Austria, a very interesting event seems to be taking place:

EMULATING THE MIND
1st International Engineering & Neuro-Psychoanalysis Forum

The agenda seems to have a bearing on Cognitive Computing. Of course, to be true Cognitive Computing, the title should have been "Emulating the Mind by Simulating the Brain"!

May 01, 2007

Recent News Coverage of our CoSyNe 2007 paper...

Our CoSyNe 2007 paper attracted a lot of attention recently.

BBC News, Mouse brain simulated on computer
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6600965.stm?ls

New Scientist
http://www.newscientist.com/blog/technology/2007/04/recreating-mind-of-mouse.html

United Press International
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/2007/04/28/supercomputer_imitates_mouse_brain/

The Guardian, UK, "Just how powerful is the brain of a mouse?"
http://technology.guardian.co.uk/weekly/story/0,,2070570,00.html

Newkerala.com
http://www.newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=23660

The Post Chronicle
http://www.postchronicle.com/news/technology/article_21277595.shtml

Robots.net
http://robots.net/article/2218.html

IMEDINEWS
http://www.imedinews.ge/en/news_read/36269

EARTHtimes.org
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/57046.html

Engadget
http://www.engadget.com/2007/04/29/ibms-bluegene-l-supercomputer-simulates-half-a-mouse-brain/

SlashDot
http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/04/28/1638204

KurzweilAI.net
http://www.kurzweilai.net/news/frame.html?main=/news/news_single.html?id3D6735 

DailyTech
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=7094

LiveScience
http://www.livescience.com/scienceoffiction/070413_mouse_brain.html

ACM TechNews
http://technews.acm.org/archives.cfm?fo=2007-05-may/may-02-2007.html

Taipei Times
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/bizfocus/archives/2007/05/06/2003359755

Toronto Star, 10 things we learned this week
http://www.thestar.com/sciencetech/article/210882

A Sample of Blogs:

The Early Signs of the Long Tomorrow, Jamais Cascio
http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/cascio20070425/

"Of Mice and Megabytes" CNET
http://news.com.com/8301-10784_3-9714610-7.html

The Ledger
http://blogs.theledger.com/default.asp?item=584401

Neowin
http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=39876

http://www.smm.org/buzz/blog/computer_simulates_half_a_mouse_brain

http://techdailydose.nationaljournal.com/2007/04/mouse_brain_takes_a_ride_on_ib_1.php

http://digg.com/general_sciences/Mouse_brain_simulated_on_computer_3

http://www.newscloud.com/read/83305

http://tailrank.com/1820607/Mouse-brain-simulated-on-computer

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=490613

http://www.boingboing.net/2007/04/26/simulated_mousebrain.html

http://science.netscape.com/story/2007/04/27/mouse-brain-simulated-on-computer/

http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/april2007/280407mouse.htm

http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2007/04/28/2562320.htm

http://www.ioltechnology.co.za/article_inter.php?iFeedArticleId=10418001

http://www.madshrimps.be/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=32894

http://keznews.com/16644=Mouse_brain_simulated_on_computer

http://www.n-philes.com/forums/showthread.php?p=50599501#post50599501

http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/918067/supercomputer_imitates_mouse_brain/index.html

http://reddiggulo.us/Mouse-brain-simulated-on-computer.html

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1825311/posts

http://groups.google.com.sg/group/talk.origins/browse_thread/thread/8e126aba5814c4c6/e5c738654b1b770d

http://www.dailyindia.com/show/137284.php/Supercomputer-imitates-mouse-brain

http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070428103713AAi9pSV

http://tech.zicos.com/news.php/n/1026815/Mouse-Brain-Simulated-Via-Computer

http://rss.crossmap.com/article/mouse-brain-simulated-on-computer/story178835.htm

http://r3dw0rm.com/?p=363

http://www.greythumb.org/blog/

http://www.impactlab.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=11517

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1825556/posts

http://www.nordichardware.com/news,6211.html

http://blogs.chron.com/sciguy/archives/2007/04/this_is_wild_a.html

http://www.cognitie.nl/news/mouse-brain-simulated-on-computer

http://www.smm.org/buzz/blog/computer_simulates_half_a_mouse_brain